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Showing posts with label Defensive Driving. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Defensive Driving. Show all posts

Toolbox Talk # 03 : DEFENSIVE DRIVING

Toolbox Talk # 3

Defensive Driving

DEFENSIVE DRIVING


In all cases, while operating a motor vehicle, drivers should practice defensive driving techniques. Defensive driving is the art of driving so as to prevent and avoid traffic crashes, regardless of the unsafe conditions and actions created by other drivers and adverse road and or weather conditions.

A good defensive driver will practice the following eight techniques:
  1. Glance well ahead in the direction of travel. Look 2 or 3 vehicles ahead to observe driving conditions in front of you. This allows you to consider a condition before you reach it.
  2. Get the “big picture”; learn to see the entire roadway. Sweep the scene, sides and back. Avoid “tunnel vision”. Keep your eyes moving; Position vehicle slightly offset to traffic to increase your field of vision.
  3. Always allow an escape route, leave a cushion by slowing or moving ahead of the vehicles beside you.
  4. Keep your vehicle visible and signal your intentions early.
  5. When stopped prior to making right/left turns across incoming traffic leave wheels straight to prevent being pushed into oncoming traffic in the event of a rear-end crash.
  6. When entering intersections practice looking left/right/left. Be sure to come to a full stop before proceeding.
  7. Learn to compensate for hazards such as weather, debris, potholes, loose gravel, or sand.
  8. ALWAYS maintain a cautious driving attitude. Remember, when entering a Rotary that Massachusetts law requires you to yield to vehicles already in the Rotary.

Safety Check : Defensive Driving



Safety Check : Defensive Driving

In all cases, while operating a motor vehicle, drivers should practice defensive driving techniques. 


What is Defensive Driving ?

Defensive driving is the art of driving so as to prevent and avoid traffic crashes, regardless of the unsafe conditions and actions created by other drivers and adverse road and or weather conditions
 



A good defensive driver will practice the following eight techniques: 


  • Glance well ahead in the direction of travel. Look 2 or 3 vehicles ahead to observe driving conditions in front of you. This allows you to consider a condition before you reach it.
  • Get the "big picture"; learn to see the entire roadway. Sweep the scene, sides and back. Avoid "tunnel vision". Keep your eyes moving; Position vehicle slightly offset to traffic to increase your field of vision.
  • Always allow an escape route, leave a cushion by slowing or moving ahead of the vehicles beside you.
  • Keep your vehicle visible and signal your intentions early.
  • When stopped prior to making right/left turns across incoming traffic leave wheels straight to prevent being pushed into oncoming traffic in the event of a rear-end crash.
  • When entering intersections practice looking left/right/left. Be sure to come to a full stop before proceeding.
  • Learn to compensate for hazards such as weather, debris, potholes, loose gravel, or sand.
  • ALWAYS maintain a cautious driving attitude.
Remember, while entering on road follow rules & regulation laid by country/state government for road safety also don't forget to carry driving license & vehicle documents.

Defensive Driving


Defensive Driving

Defensive driving is driving in a way to avoid and prevent accidents, regardless of the unsafe conditions that may exist around you.

Common hazards:

  • Changing road or traffic conditions
  • Impaired driving - alcohol, presrciptions, drugs
  • Distractions such as cell phones, maps and food
  • Driving while sleepy or drowsy
 Driving drunk, distracted or drowsy are considered approximately equally dangerous.

Safe procedures:

  • Drive at a speed safe for conditions. Go slower than posted limits in snow or rain.
    Maintain enough space between the vehicle in front of you (2-4 seconds or longer if conditions are slippery or for commercial vehicles).
  • Get the big picture – occasionally glance 2-3 vehicles ahead of you, to your sides and behind you. Use your mirrors and check blind spots.
  • Maintain an escape route in case of an unexpected event.
  • Look left, right and left again before entering an intersection.
  • Ensure the path is clear even if you have the right of way at an intersection (green light).
  • Do not drive with even a small amount of alcohol or drugs in your system.
  • Avoid distractions, especially cell phones. Pull over and stop if you need to make a call or text.
  • Pull over and rest if you are excessively drowsy.
  • Always wear your seat belt.
  • Always wear crash helmet while riding two wheeler.


There are many things we can’t control on the road – especially conditions and other drivers’ behaviors. But by driving defensively we can help to avoid accidents regardless of the hazards present.

Toolbox Topics: Take Safety With You

Toolbox Topics: Take Safety With You

What does Take Safety with You mean?It means driving defensively, using seat belts in our vehicles, using firearms safely when hunting and applying safety practices at home, including wearing safety shoes when mowing the lawn; Wearing safety Eye wear while hammering nails; Using lighter fluid to start charcoal grills, not gasoline; Turning off a circuit breaker before replacing a light fixture.

We want everyone to develop the habit of thinking about safety during a work shift, on the way home, at home or on vacation. Thus, think about safety before you start any job, when you go to do something that's potentially dangerous (i.e., lighting a gas burner, jump­ starting a vehicle, etc.), when putting on safety equipment and by making sure machine guards are in place. Think about safety several times; Particularly, if you have to change what you are doing.

Ask yourself the following questions at work and at home:

  • Do I know the safety procedures for this job or task? Are they adequate? Do I really understand them?
  • ­ What personal protective equipment do I need? Is it in good condition? Is it adequate?
  • ­ What tools and other equipment do I need to do the job safely? Are they the correct ones? Are they in good condition? Do I know how to use them?
  • ­ Are there other risks to my safety or the safety of others? What if something happens quickly or unexpectedly? Do I know how to respond to avoid injury?
  • How often should we have thoughts about safety?
Constantly! The human mind is one of the fastest processors of information. To think about all of this need only take a few seconds.

Motorcycle Safety Awareness


Motorcycle Safety Awareness

Many of us ride motorcycles and we are all exposed to them on the roads. For those who ride, Motorcycle Safety means inspecting your motorcycle, wearing proper motorcycle riding gear, and riding defensively on the road.

The found the causes of motorcycle crashed can be attributed to:
  • lack of basic riding skills
  • failure to appreciate the inherent operating characteristics
  • failure to appreciate the limitations of the motorcycle 
  • failure to use special precautions while riding 
  • failure to use defensive driving techniques. 
  • lack of specific braking and cornering skills 
  • failure to follow speed limit
Many fatal single-vehicle motorcycle crashes involve alcohol. A motorcycle requires more skill and coordination to operate than a car. Riding a motorcycle while under the influence of any amount of alcohol significantly decreases an operator's ability to operate the motorcycle safely.

In road accident most of motorcycle riders killed in traffic crashes are not licensed or are improperly licensed to operate a motorcycle. By not obtaining a motorcycle operator license, riders are bypassing the only method they and state licensing agencies have to ensure they have the knowledge and skill needed to safely and skillfully operate a motorcycle.

Defensive Driving Tips

Defensive Driving Tips


The defensive driving program should stress how to avoid collisions and how to drive safely in the dark.

Collisions are a major cause of injury and death in traffic accidents. The main types of collisions are:
  • Head-on collisions
  • Hit from behind
  • Hitting the driver in front
  • Side collisions
Two-car collisions are among the most common kind of traffic accident. About one-third of two-car collisions occur at intersections, so workers need to be especially careful when entering an intersection.

Head-on collisions are particularly dangerous and can be deadly. The key to avoiding them is to keep looking ahead down the road for possible problems. If a crash looks like it’s coming, employees should slow down and even go off the road to the right to avoid a head-on crash.

Rear-end collisions are also dangerous, but they, too, are preventable. For example, employees should:
  • Signal their intentions when stopping or turning;
  • Be alert for tailgaters;
  • Slow down gradually; and
  • Leave room in front of you when stopped so that if you are hit from behind, at least they won’t hit another vehicle in front.

To avoid colliding with a vehicle in front, employees should take these precautions:
  • Look well ahead for hazards, brake lights, and turn signals.
  • Always maintain sufficient distance between their vehicle and the vehicle in front so that they have enough room to stop safely.
To avoid side collisions, workers should be sure to approach all intersections with caution, and always look both ways before proceeding—even if they have right-of-way. They should never try to force their way through an intersection if another driver is set on going first. It is better to let the other driver go ahead of you than it is to get into an accident that can be costly and perhaps dangerous to them and to others.

Nighttime Driving


More accidents occur at night than any other time of day. The reason is simple: It is much harder to see at night, and much harder to react quickly when you do see a hazard.

Here are some defensive driving tips you can share with employees for driving at night:
  • Keep windshield clean to improve vision.
  • Turn lights on 1/2 hour before sunset.
  • Increase following distance to 4 seconds.
  • Be extra careful on curves and at intersections.
  • Switch from high to low beams to keep from blinding other drivers.
  • If you have trouble, pull completely off the road and use flashers.

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