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Showing posts with label Housekeeping Safety. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Housekeeping Safety. Show all posts

Housekeeping Safety : Hazards @ Home

Topic : Housekeeping Safety

Hazards @ Home 

Housekeeping activities can put you at risk for strains and sprains. Be sure to do these activities with safety in mind.

Making beds

Risk factors:

  • Awkward postures — like bending over while reaching forward to tuck in the sheets.
  • Gripping with force — like using a pinch grip when pulling up the sheets.

Safe work practices:

  • Avoid bending forward. Bend knees, not your back.
  • Flex your knees as you make the bed. Walk around the bed rather than reaching over it. If you must work from one side, keep one hand on the bed for support.

Cleaning

Risk factors:

  • Awkward postures — like bending over or kneeling, or reaching overhead for a long time.
  • Static postures with force — like scrubbing while bending or reaching.
  • Contact stress — like kneeling on hard surfaces.

Safe work practices: Use cleaning equipment with long handles for hard-to-reach areas.
  • If kneeling, place a folded towel under your knees to avoid the pressure.
  • Make sure your protective gloves fit well so you don’t use extra force when gripping.
  • Use a sturdy, slip-proof step stool when doing high-reach tasks.

Doing Laundry

Risk factors:

  • Awkward postures — like bending forward and twisting when loading and unloading the washer and dryer.
  • Gripping with force — like lifting laundry with a pinch grip which increases the force required by the muscles in your hand and forearm.

Safe work practices:

  • Carry loads you can manage comfortably.
  • Don’t twist your body while lifting. Follow your feet and move side-to-side.
  • Avoid bending forward. Flex your knees when reaching into the washer or dryer.
  • Use a power grip rather than a pinch grip when handling laundry.
  • Fold clothes at a comfortable height. Your shoulders should be relaxed.

Housekeeping Safety — Requires @ construction


Topic : Housekeeping Safety 
 
Requires @ Construction

If your housekeeping habits are poor, the result may be employee injuries, penalties, and even difficulty in securing future work. Think about how a “minor” issue like housekeeping can have such serious consequences. We should also be setting the expectation for everyone who enters the job site that housekeeping matters!

Hazards:
  • Out-of-place objects such as leaning lumber, plywood and other materials that pose tripping, falling or striking hazards.
  • Misplaced tools.
  • Lumber with protruding nails. Remember to pull all nails, bending over is not good enough.
  • Cords or hoses across walk ways. Elevate if possible, cover with plywood or lumber, bevel edges to reduce trips.
  • Protruding pipes, lumber, rebar or other materials in travel areas.
  • Debris from cutting of conduit, copper and plastic pipes in the travel paths.
  • Trash from lunch and breaks thrown on the ground.
  • Debris in stairwells

Safe procedures:

  • Clean up after yourself.
  • Inform all subcontractors of their responsibility for housekeeping.
  • Pick up your trash and debris and dispose of it properly.
  • Store everything straight and square.
  • Stack materials orderly and secure them so they won’t topple.
  • Implement a routine cleaning schedule. Depending on the work, it might be daily or weekly for more extensive clean-ups.
  • Keep your work area clean throughout the day. This will minimize the amount of time needed to clean a “larger mess” at the end of the day.

Let’s ask ourselves:
  • How is housekeeping on our worksite?
  • What can we do to improve housekeeping on this project?
  • Where are the dump spots? Do we have enough storage containers?

We are responsible for our job site, do your part!

Housekeeping Safety : Why Housekeeping Required ?

 

Topic : Housekeeping Safety 
 
Why Housekeeping Required ?
 
You never get a second chance to make a good first impression. The negative impressions and implications of poor housekeeping can affect you, your customers and co-workers for a long time.

If your housekeeping habits are poor, the result may be employee injuries, penalties and even difficulty in securing future work.

Hazards:

  • Employees trip, fall, strike or are struck by out-of-place objects.
  • Injuries from using improper tools because the correct tool can’t be found.
  • Lowered production because of the time spent maneuvering over and around someone else’s mess, and time spent looking for proper tools and materials.
  • Time spent investigating and reporting accidents that could have been avoided.

Safe procedures:

  • Clean up after yourself.
  • Pick up your trash and debris and dispose of it properly.
  • Have a place for everything and put everything in its place.
  • Store everything straight and square.
  • Stack materials orderly and secure them so they won’t topple.
  • Implement a routine cleaning schedule.Keep your work area clean throughout the day. This will minimize the amount of time needed to clean a “larger mess” at the end of the day.

An uncluttered workplace shows respect for those who work here. Help keep it that way!
Now let’s talk about how we can improve housekeeping in our facility.

Housekeeping Safety : Good Housekeeping- Is For a Safe Space

Topic : Housekeeping Safety

Good Housekeeping- Is For a Safe Space

Housekeeping at a construction site, office, or home can often provide an indicator for the level of safety culture and expectations for that project or facility.  When housekeeping is highly maintained, injuries are typically quite low. When housekeeping is low, you can expect injuries will increase. 
Why?


Poor housekeeping provides more safety hazards in the work and home environments, causing more chances for injuries to occur. The most obvious hazards of poor housekeeping are slips, trips, and falls from cluttered and dirty walkway areas.



Keeping your work and living spaces clean and organized is an important way to prevent accidents. Below are some suggestions of how to reduce risk of injury.

Home
  • Keep floors and stairs clear of objects that could cause slips, trips, and falls.
  • Store cleaning products away from food, and out of the reach of children.
  • Keep surfaces clean to prevent the spread of germs.
  • Be careful with heavy objects stored high that require overhead reaching.
  • Properly store items that could cause injury from falling.
  • Ensure proper lighting to prevent shadows and trip hazards.
Office
  • Keep floors and walkways clear of objects that could cause slips, trips, and falls.
  • Keep drawers and filing cabinets shut to prevent them from tipping over, or from people running into them.
  • Do not over-stack materials which have the potential to tip over.
  • Clean coffee cups and other food containers to prevent the growth of bacteria.
  • Clean up all spills right away.
  • Keep your work area organized and clutter-free.
Construction Site
  • Keep walkways and traffic zones free from debris, power cords, hoses, etc.
  • Remove waste to minimize fire hazards.
  • Clean up and dispose of scrap, waste, and unused materials.
  • Be cautious of slippery surfaces like sealed concrete or sawdust.
  • Keep materials at least 5 feet from openings, roof edges, excavations, or trenches.
  • Remove, or bend over, nails that protrude from lumber.

Housekeeping Safety : Help Workers Make the Connection Between Housekeeping and Their Health and Safety

Topic : Housekeeping Safety 

Help Workers Make the Connection Between Housekeeping and Their Health and Safety

Is your workplace a mess? If so, it's time to get employees to clean up their act, for the sake of their safety and health.
A messy workplace is more than just unsightly. It has the potential to create hazards, including:
  • Fire! Paper garbage, wood shavings, combustible dusts, rags soaked with flammable chemicals—if not disposed of properly, these items can create fire and explosion hazards in the workplace.
  • Falls! Did you know that most workplace falls that result in a reportable injury are falls on the same level? How does that happen? Walkways and work areas that are cluttered become dangerous to walk through, and you—or your coworkers—can slip, trip, and fall.
  • Fungus! In areas that are not kept clean and dry, or where food wastes are disposed of, waste can rot and mold can grow, creating a health hazard.
  • Infestations! Messy areas can become pest harborages—nesting and reproduction areas for everything from cockroaches to rats. These creatures can contribute to allergic reactions and workplace asthma, and they can also carry disease

Keep It Safe! Clean It Up!

Keeping the workplace safe and healthy starts with requiring employees to:
  • Put things away. Put your tools and materials away at the end of your shift or when you switch projects. Throw away trash, making sure to keep general wastes, hazardous wastes, and flammable chemical wastes separated and to place them in appropriate containers.
  • Take out the trash. When your trash container is full, or at the end of your shift (if this is required by your supervisor), take out the trash. This will prevent accumulations of flammable, putrescible, and otherwise problematic waste.
  • Sweep up. If the dust you're sweeping could be hazardous to breathe, use wet methods or a HEPA vacuum to clean it up.
  • Dust. Don't let dust accumulate on surfaces. As with sweeping, if the dust could be dangerous to breathe, use wet methods or a HEPA vacuum. Remember to check the top of surfaces that are above your eye level and behind obstructions.
  • Mop up. Take care of damp spots and spills right away if you can.

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