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Showing posts with label Safety Check. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Safety Check. Show all posts

Safety Check : Ladders: Job Built- Ladder


Safety Check : Ladders: Job Built- Ladder

A Job-made ladder is a ladder that is fabricated by employees, typically at the construction site. Job-built ladders must conform to certain standards to ensure safety of the user. While job-built ladders can provide safer solutions than using makeshift arrangements for access, they must be used with care.
Here are some tips to help ensure safety when using job-built ladders:

  1. Do not load ladders beyond the maximum intended load for which they were built.
  2. Allow only one person at a time on a single-width ladder and no more than two people on a double width ladder, each on a separate side.
  3. As with all ladders, set job-built ladders on a level, solid surface.
  4. Keep ladders from passageways, doorways, or driveways where they could be bumped or damaged by adjacent activities, unless the ladder area is barricaded.
  5. Always secure the ladder at the top and whenever possible, secure or stake the bottom too.
  6. Job built ladders should be inspected on a regular basis.
  7. When using a job-built ladder be sure to remove rungs which are over the upper level.

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Safety Check : Ladders: Proper Access


Safety Check : Ladders: Proper Access

Ladders are one of the biggest hazards of overhead work and result in many accidents. The worker on the ladder is exposed to the risk of a fall, and other workers could slip or trip on the ladder or tools and materials left at the access point.


Take these precautions to protect yourself and your co-workers when using ladders to access upper levels:
  1. Always select a ladder that is the correct length to safely reach the working height.
  2. Position ladders so that the base of the ladder is one foot away from the wail for every four feet of ladder height.
  3. Do not tie ladders together to create longer sections.
  4. When using a ladder to access elevations, make sure that it extends
  5. Three feet above the landing surface for ease in mounting and dismounting. If this is not possible, secure the ladder and use a grasping device such as a grab rail to assist in mounting and dismounting the ladder.
  6. Position the ladder so that both feet are resting on a stable, level surface and that both rails are resting evenly against a solid, secure surface. Secure the ladder to prevent movement.
  7. Keep ail access points to ladders clear of tools, materials or debris.
  8. When using ladders near doors, equipment travel paths or similar areas make sure the area is blocked off to prevent the ladder from being struck or dislodged. Secure straight ladders in place prior to use

Safety Check : Ladders - Metal Ladders


Safety Check : Ladders - Metal Ladders

Ladders can be hazardous when used incorrectly, metal ladders pose additional risks, particularly when working around electricity.

Work safely with metal ladders by taking these steps:


  1. Inspect the ladder before using to ensure that it free of sharp edges dents, and bent steps, rungs, or rails. If the ladder is defective, remove it from service.
  2. Do not attempt to straighten a bent metal ladder.
  3. Make sure metal ladders have slip-resistant rubber or plastic feet.
  4. Keep rungs free of slippery material (grease, oil, paint, snow ice etc.).
  5. DO NOT use metal ladders around electrical equipment. Keep at least 10 feet away. Metal ladders conduct electricity.
  6. If you or the ladder could contact exposed, energized equipment, use a ladder with non-conductive side-rails.
  7. When working from a metal ladder, use only double-insulated or properly rounded electrical tools.

Safety Check : Ladder - Warning Labels


Safety Check :  Ladder - Warning Labels

Improper use of ladders can lead to serious injury as a result of falls, and in some cases electrocution. Warning labels provide information on hazards and instruction for safe use, plus they describe ladder weight and height limits that help you choose the proper ladder for the job.
  1. Always read and follow warning labels on ladders.
  2. Choose the right ladder for the job.
  3. Do not choose a ladder with height or weight limits that are less than you need to perform the job.
  4. Follow instructions for safe use.
  5. Do not remove labels.
  6. If labels have become worn or damage, replace them if possible.
  7. Remove ladder from service if unsure of suitable condition and usability

Safety Check : Scaffold Safety


Safety Check : Scaffold Safety 

When scaffolds are not erected or used properly, fall hazards can occur. Million construction workers frequently work on scaffolds. Protecting these workers from scaffold-related accidents would prevent an injuries and fatalities at job.

Take these steps to help protect workers and reduce accidents:
  • Follow industry guidelines for erecting scaffolds: verify that each scaffold and its components is capable of supporting, without failure, its own weight and at least four times the maximum intended load. Erect and dismantle under the direction of a scaffold competent person.
  • Inspect scaffolds daily before use; check footing, guard rails, connectors, fastening, tie-ins and bracing.
  • Do not use unstable objects such as barrels, boxes, loose bricks, or concrete blocks to support scaffolds or planks.
  • Fully plank platforms on all working levels.
  • Install guardrails and toe-boards on all open sides and ends of platforms on scaffolding over 10 feet above floor or ground.
  • If a scaffold is more than two feet above or below a level, provide adequate access, such as a ramp, ladder, or steps.
  • Do not erect, use, dismantle, alter or move scaffolds so they, or any conductive material handled on them, might come closer than 10 feet to energized overhead power lines.
  • Obtain scaffold user training prior to working on scaffolding.
  • Inspect all scaffolds prior to use or at least on a daily basis.

Safety Checks : Lockout/Tag out



Safety Checks : Lockout/Tag out
 


 
Lockout/tag out procedures is used to isolate hazardous energy sources from electrical, hydraulic, pneumatic or rotary machinery when service or maintenance work is required.         

Lockout/tag out devices helps prevent accidental start-up of equipment or machinery, and ensure personal safety from possible energy releases. 

 
Take the following steps to help prevent exposure to hazardous energy:
  • Know and follow all procedures for lockout/tag out in your workplace.
  • Assume at all times that power is "on." This practice ensures a cautious approach that may prevent an accident or injury.
  • Lockout and tag all machinery and equipment before performing maintenance.
Do not lock out and tag machinery/equipment unless you are authorized to do so.

Do not attempt to operate any switch, valve, or other energy isolating device bearing a lock or a tag.


Do not remove tags from machines or equipment unless authorized to do so. 


Always follow rules & regulations of country / state that only the person who applies the lock and/or tag can remove it, except in an emergency.

Safety Check : Proper use of External Cords



Safety Check : Proper use of External Cords

 

An extension cord looks harmless, but most extension cords carry 110 volts of electricity, and 110 volts can kill. Extension cords, if not used correctly, can cause electric shock, fires (from overloading circuits), and even slipping and tripping hazards. 

Follow these tips for safe use:

  1. Check that extension cords are correctly rated for the amount electricity they are to carry and are CE approved. Heavy commercial duty cords are the minimum recommended on any construction site.
  2. Ensure that all extension cords are serviceable and free of exposed wiring and splices, frayed areas, and/or deteriorated insulation. Discard extension cords with broken wires or damaged insulation.
  3. Connect only one device at a time to extension cords.
  4. Use extension cords for temporary purposes, not for permanent installation. Where there is a permanent need for an electrical outlet, one should be installed. Always use ELCB/MCB with extension cords.
  5. Do not tape or splice extension cords.
  6. Do not place extension cords across walkways or doorways where they could pose a tripping hazard.
  7. Do not place extension cords under carpets, under doors, or other locations that subject the cord to abrasion or other damage.
  8. Do not drive any vehicle over extension cords

Safety Check : Electrical Burns


Safety Check : Electrical Burns
 


 


Electrical burns occur when current jumps from an electrical outlet, cord, or appliance and passes through your body. Electrical burns cause tissue damage, and are one of the most serious injuries you can receive and need to be treated immediately.

Burns suffered in electrical incidents can be divided into three types; electrical burns, arc burns, and thermal contact burns. AN three types of burns may be produced simultaneously.

  • High voltage contact burns can burn internal tissues while leaving only very small injuries on the outside of the skin where it enters and much larger wound where it exits. Burns suffered in electrical accidents may affect the skin, muscles, and bone.
  • High temperatures near the body produced by an electric arc or explosion cause arc or flash burns. They should also be attended to promptly.
  • Thermal contact burns occur when skin comes in contact with overheated electric equipment, or when clothing is ignited in an electrical incident.
  • If someone receives an electrical burn, seek medical attention immediately. If the victim is still in contact with the energized circuit, shut it off. Do not touch the victim. You do not want to be a victim too.

To prevent electrical burns, use safe work practices, lock out and tag all machines/ equipment/circuits during service, wear proper persona! Protective, and stay at least 10 feet away from overhead power lines

Safety Check : Slips, Trips and Falls


Safety Check : Slips, Trips and Falls
 
 

HAZARDS


  • Unsafe ladders, steps and scaffolds.
  • Slippery surfaces and improper footwear for the working environment.
  • Obstructions in and on floors and walkways.
  • Poor lighting.
  • Access to / from vehicles.

LEARNING POINTS

  • Inspect ladders and steps prior to working and ensure that the ladder is set on firm, level ground at the correct incline (1 in 4). Use two hands whilst climbing, do not over reach when working from a ladder. When a harness or fall arrestors are being worn, remember to check the condition of the equipment before use and check that people know how to use them.
  • Inspect scaffolds prior to working and ensure that the scaffold is complete, the working platforms are clear from tripping hazards and, in the case of mobile scaffolds, the castors are locked to prevent movement.
  • Avoid slips by keeping watch for hazardous working conditions - wet floors, icy areas, oil and grease for example. Promptly clean up the spillage; do not leave it for someone else.
  • Avoid trips by maintaining a good standard of housekeeping and ensure that materials are stored and access-ways are kept clear.
  • Avoid falls by using fully guarded work platforms. Where this is impracticable, fall arrestors and harnesses must be clipped onto a solid structure at all times whilst working at height. In addition, cherry pickers should be used instead of "beam walking

Safety Check : Use of Chain Saws



Safety Check : Use of Chain Saws
 

 

A chainsaw (alternatively spelled chain saw) is a portable, mechanical saw which cuts with a set of teeth attached to a rotating chain that runs along a guide bar. It is used in activities such as tree felling, limbing, bucking, pruning etc.



Controls and precautions to be observed while using chain saws :
  • All chainsaw operators should have received formal training.
  • Before using a chainsaw carry out the following checks:
    • Check guards are in place, in good condition and secure.
    • Check chain brake operation (if fitted).
    • Check throttle and interlock for serviceability.
  • Ensure you have the required PPE and that it is serviceable. This must include leggings.
  • Always engage the chain brake and place saw on a secure surface clear of any obstructions before starting.
  • Never make adjustments to the chainsaw whilst it is running.
  • Never place any part of your body in the saw’s line of cut.
  • Before moving with the chainsaw, switch it off, (apply the chain brake), and fit the scabbard over the chain. Carry by front handle with chain facing rearwards.
  • Maintain a firm grip, using both hands, on the chainsaw when in operation.
  • Stop saw motor before fueling.
  • Check for fuel leakage and ensure fuel cap is correctly replaced.
  • Refuel chainsaws in well-ventilated areas and at least 3 meters away from where you are going to use the chainsaw.

Safety Check : Power Tools


Safety Check : Power Tools 
 
  • Employees have the responsibility for properly using and maintaining tools.
  • Appropriate PPE should be worn due to the hazards that may be encountered while using portable tools.
  • Avoid dangerous environments. Don’t use power tools in a damp, wet and/or explosive atmosphere.
  • Around flammable materials, sparks produced by iron and steel hand tools can be ignition source. Where this hazard exists, use spark-resistant tools made from brass, plastic, aluminum, or wood.
  • Employees should be trained in the use of all tools-not just power tools. They should understand the potential hazards as well as the safety precautions
  • If you’re a power tool user:
    • Never carry a tool by the cord or hose.
    • Never yank cord/hoses to disconnect from receptacle.
  • Keep cords/hoses away from heat/oil, sharp edges.
  • Disconnect tools when not in use, before servicing, when changing accessories such as blades/bits cutters.
Employees using electric tools must be aware of several dangers; the most serious is the possibility

Electrocution

 
Among the chief hazards of electric-powered tools are burns and slight shocks, which can lead to injuries or even heart failure.

Safety Checks : Hand Tools


Safety Checks : Hand Tools
 
A hand tool is any tool that is powered by hand rather than a motor. Categories of hand tools include wrenches, pliers, cutters, files, striking tools, struck or hammered tools, screwdrivers, vises, clamps, snips, saws, drills and knives.

1. It is important to maintain hand tools in good working condition. The following precautionary measures will be kept in view:
  • Wooden handles shall be kept free from splinters and cracks.
  • Wooden handles for hammers and sledgehammers shall be secured with tapered wedges.
  • Steel wedges, spanners, hammers, etc, shall be free from burrs.
  • Non-sparking brass tools, chisels, etc, should be trimmed down to prevent "mushrooming" the head of the tool.
2. Files should have proper handles. Avoid using files with bare tangs. 

3. Always wear eye protection while using striking tools.
 
4. While using a hammer to strike a spanner, chisel, etc, the tool being hit shall not be held by hand. Always hold a striking tool in place with rope, stiff wire loop, or other means to keep the hands away from being hit by the hammer.
 
5. Following 5 basic safety rules can prevent all hazards involved in the use of tools:
  • Keep all tools in good condition with regular maintenance (CHECK INSPECTION STICKERS).
  • Use the right tool for the right job.
  • Inspect each tool for damage before use.
  • Operate according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Provide and use the proper PPE.
6. The greatest hazards posed by hand tools result from misuse and improper maintenance. The tool may also become unsafe to use. In fact, it is estimated that hand tool mishaps are responsible for about 1 out of 12 workplace injuries-including cuts and bruises, punctures, fractures, even loss of finger, hand, or eye. Some examples to misuse:
  • Using a screwdriver as a chisel may cause the tip of the screwdriver to break and fly, hitting the user or other employees.
  • If a wooden handle on a tool such as a hammer is loose, splintered, or cracked, the head of the tool may fly off and strike the user or another worker.
  • A wrench must be used if its jaws are sprung, because it might slip.

Safety Check : Scaffolds - Safe work Practices


Safety Check : Scaffolds - Safe work Practices

 

 
Failure to follow safe work practices when using scaffolds is a major cause of scaffolding-related accidents. 



To ensure safety, learn to recognize hazards, and always use these safe work practices:



  1. Inspect scaffolds before each work shift and after any incident that could affect the structural integrity of the scaffold. Take any questionable scaffold out of service, tag it and report damage or defects immediately.
  2. Do not load scaffolds beyond their capacity. Keep only the tools and materials you need on the scaffold.
  3. Keep the platforms and area around the scaffold clear of debris and unneeded equipment, material, and other hazards that could cause a worker to trip or fall.
  4. Use guardrails and/or personal fall arrest system working on a scaffold that is 10 feet high or higher.
  5. Maintain proper clearance near power lines (at least 10 feet, plus 4 inches for every kilovolt above 50 kilovolts).
  6. Wear head protection and other personal protective equipment as necessary.
  7. Do not work on scaffolds during storms or high winds and clear all ice and snow from the platforms before using them.
  8. Keep others away from the base of the scaffold while work is occurring overhead

Safety Check : Ladders - Fixed


Safety Check : Ladders - Fixed

A fixed ladder is a ladder permanently attached to a structure, building or equipment. Fixed ladders pose hazards including slippery surfaces, unsure footing, and structural damage. 


Take these precautions when using fixed ladders:

  1. Check rungs to ensure that they're free of splinters, sharp edges, burrs or projections that may create a hazard. Reports ail defects promptly.
  2. Clean muddy or slippery boot soles before mounting a fixed ladder, or any ladder.
  3. When climbing fixed ladders on towers, tanks, or chimneys, use appropriate ladder safety devices as instructed. A ladder safety device is an appliance that will arrest the fall of an individual working at elevated heights.
  4. Wait until the other person has exited the ladder before ascending or descending.
  5. When climbing fixed ladders, follow the same basic rules as with portable ladders.
  6. Take advantage of landing platforms to rest when climbing or descending from heights.

Safety Check - Ladders - Extension Ladders



Safety Check - Ladders - Extension Ladders

Each year several workers are killed by falls from ladders. Falls from extension ladders can be particularly dangerous because people are usually working at greater heights. 


Follow these safety tips when using extension ladders:

  1. When choosing an extension ladder, keep in mind that the length of a ladder is different from its usable length. The height these ladders can safely reach is reduced by the angle at which the ladder must be set up.
  2. Position an extension ladders so that the base of the ladder is one foot away from the wall for every four feet of ladder height. This ratio is important because if the angle is too steep, you can fall backward. If the angle is too horizontal, the ladder can slip out from under you.
  3. Make sure that both feet are on stable and level surfaces, and that both rails are resting evenly on the resting spot. Secure ladders to prevent accidental movement.
  4. Make sure side rails are at least three feet above the landing point, or that an adequate grab rail is provided.
  5. After you set up an extension ladder, lock the top section in place.
  6. If using multi-section ladders, make sure sections overlap — by at least 3 feet for ladders up to 32 feet, by 4 feet for ladders 32 feet to 48 feet, and by 5 feet for ladders 48 feet to 60 feet.
  7. When working from an extension ladder, consider using a fall protection system attached to a secure anchor point on the building, especially if doing work that involves pushing, pulling, or prying
 

Safety Check : Ladder - Climbing


Safety Check : Ladder - Climbing
 

Every year many fatalities & injuries are getting reported due to falls on stairways and ladders used at work place and Home. 

Therefore, When using ladders, be mindful and follow these basic safety rules:


  1. Make sure rungs and steps are clear of grease, oil, dirt, snow, or ice before climbing.
  2. Clean muddy or slippery boot soles before climbing a ladder.
  3. Always face a ladder when climbing up or down.
  4. Follow the three-point rule: keep at least both feet and one hand or both hands and one foot on the ladder at all times.
  5. Keep your body centered between the side rails of the ladder so you don't tip over the ladder. A good rule is to always keep your belt buckle inside the rails of a ladder.
  6. Avoid carrying materials or tools when climbing a ladder. Carry tools up or down in a belt or hoist them in a bag or bucket.
  7. Never stand on the top two steps of a stepladder and the top four rungs on other Ladders.
  8. Inspect the ladder before climbing to make sure it is in good shape. Report all defects to your supervisor.
  9. Do not use any ladder that is defective.

Safety Check : Spill Clean up


Safety Check : Spill Clean up

 

Chemical spill prevention plans required by state and federal law must include provisions for spill cleanup. 


The following Best Management Practices will help prevent runoff in the event of a spill:


  1. Properly clean up and dispose of any spilled substance immediately to protect personnel from potential fire and health hazards and the environment.
  2. Ensure that no spilled materials are washed into the streets, gutters, storm drains, or creeks.
  3. If possible, use dry cleaning methods to clean up spills to minimize the use of water.
  4. Use a rag for small spills, a damp mop for general cleanup, and absorbent material for larger spills.
  5. Never hose down or bury dry material spills. Sweep up the material and dispose of properly.
  6. Clean up chemical materials with absorbents, gels, and foams. Use adsorbent materials on small spills rather than hosing down the spill. Remove the adsorbent materials promptly and dispose of properly.
  7. If the spilled material is hazardous, then used cleanup materials are also hazardous and must be handled as hazardous waste.

Safety Check : Spill Prevention


Safety Check : Spill Prevention

Typically, most businesses and public agencies that generate hazardous waste and/or produce transport, or store petroleum products are required by state and federal law to prepare spill control and cleanup plans.

A Spill Prevention Plan is applicable to facilities that transport, transfer, and/or store hazardous materials, petroleum products, or fertilizers that can contaminate storm water runoff. 

Regulations include the following provisions:-

  • Spill response and prevention plans should clearly state measures to stop the source of a spill, contain the spill, clean up the spill, dispose of contaminated materials, and train personnel to prevent and control future spills.
  • Spill prevention plans are most applicable to construction sites where hazardous wastes are stored or used.
  • The preliminary steps include: 
    1. Identifying potential spill or source areas such as loading and unloading, storage, and processing areas; places that generate dust or particulates; and areas designated for waste disposal; and, 
    2. Evaluating stationary facilities that include manufacturing areas, warehouses, service stations, parking lots, and access roads.
  • Employees must be trained in spill control response procedures, post-spill response procedures and be provided with emergency phone numbers.
  • Emergency spill containment and cleanup kits should be located at the facility site. The contents of the kit should be appropriate to the type and quantities of chemical or goods stored at the facility.
  • Spill kits must be inspected and maintained in all activity areas.
  • Re-fuel equipment in a designated area to minimize contamination. Pay attention to location so that spills would not enter water streams or storm water. Consider dikes or a secondary containment system.

Safety Check : Storage & Handling of Chemicals


Safety Check : Storage & Handling of Chemicals


  • Material safety data sheets shall be available for all chemicals.
  • All chemicals shall be properly stored in a protected and secured area away from other materials storage.
  • All toxic substances shall be kept in the specific container with the first aid action clearly explained on container label.
  • All personnel handling such chemicals shall be:
    • Made aware of potential hazards and emergency first aid action
    • Equipped with appropriate protective clothing such as boots, chemical suits, gloves, safety goggles & respiratory protection device as required
  • Chemicals, which are reactive such as acids and solvents, shall not be stored close together.
  • Gases or chemicals, which give off vapors, shall be stored in well- ventilated room. The suitable respiratory protection will be used in case entering an area where the presence of toxic vapor or gas is possible.
  • Safety shower and eye wash station shall be available in a chemical handling or storage area
  • Smoking or bringing any source of ignition in chemical storage area is strictly prohibited.

Safety Check : Personal Protective Equipment


Safety Check : Personal Protective Equipment
 

 

Personal protective equipment (PPE) is equipment or clothing designed to be worn by someone to protect them from the risk of injury or illness.





  1. Safety helmets are required in all fieldwork areas. The only exceptions for not wearing safety helmets are inside offices or while riding inside vehicle, etc
  2. Overalls must be worn all times inside the plant or location of work activity
  3. Eye protection must be worn while - working around blowing sand / pressurized equipment, using spark generating tools, working adjacent to operational equipment, and handling chemicals.
  4. Cotton, leather and rubber gloves are available and are required as applicable for the type of work being carried out.
  5. Safety Footwear must be of sound construction, and safety shoe with steel toes are required for various jobs. Sports shoes are not permitted for industrial duty.
  6. Hearing protection is required while working in noisy areas.
  7. Respirators are also supplied as necessary or when required by the permit to work. You may request a respirator from your supervisor Return damaged safety equipment to your supervisor for replacement.
  8. Using personal protective equipment is a mandatory requirement for safe execution of work. Personal protective equipment is available with stores

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