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Showing posts with label Safety Management. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Safety Management. Show all posts

Carelessness

Carelessness

Have you ever done anything that wasn’t really smart? Something that you know put you at increased risk of injury? When you realized what you did, whether you were hurt or not, did you ask yourself, “Why did I ever do that?” For your own self-preservation, this should be a very important question for you to answer yourself.

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Consider the fact that 80% injuries are due to unsafe Act and 20% are due to unsafe condition. If you realize that most unsafe conditions are brought about by human failure, then virtually all accidents/mishaps are brought about by unsafe acts. Why did you do something in an unsafe manner? To answer this question, you will need to put personal defenses aside and know that blame may lie within yourself. Also realize that there may be more than one reason for your actions and others may be involved.

If you knew the proper, safe way to the do the job, then you cannot claim ignorance. What is left, whether you like it or not, is carelessness. So what can cause you to temporarily disregard your own safety?

External Pressure :- “Let’s get this job done!” Usually this pressure comes from your direct supervisor. Disregarding safe practices is not going to save enough time to make a significant difference, however, any accident or injury is guaranteed to have an effect. As a matter of fact, when the pressure is applied, it is worthwhile to pay more attention to safety because we know from experience such situations frequently lead to more accidents.

Bad Habits :- You fail to follow the established procedure and you don’t get hurt (or you were not caught) this time. Psychologically, this is a reward and so you do it again and again and again. But it is also Russian roulette. You know, sooner or later, something is going to happen. There is only one way to stop it - stop taking risks! Do yourself a favor and follow the established procedures.

Internal Pressure :- “There is just so much to do and not enough time!” Are you self-motivated and self-directed? Most employers love this type of individual, but your single-minded determination to get the job done may cause you to lose sight of the dangers around you. Think of it this way: you will not finish the job if you get hurt, but you may finish the job if you don’t get hurt. Therefore, first: prevent injury; second: work to complete the job. Does that make sense?

Attitude :- “This safety stuff doesn’t apply to me!” Why doesn’t it? Safety applies to every employee all the time. It doesn’t matter if you’re a new employee or have been with the organization for many years, there is nothing in your status that will protect you from injury, except following the safe procedure.
 
Remember, safety is no more than doing the job the right way and following the established safe procedures every day, day in and day out 
 

How to Determine Independent Contractor Status

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How to Determine Independent Contractor Status

Topic: Safety Management

When a company hires independent contractors to perform jobs in your workplace, the status of these workers could make a big difference in terms of your liability should one of them be injured. Are these workers truly independent contractors or are they in effect your employees?

The following factors assistance in determining independent contractor status. It is, however, always wise to check with your company's attorneys concerning contacts and worker status whenever your company hires independent contractors.
  1. Is the individual under the direction or control of the independent contractor, not your employer, while working in your workplace?
  2. Does the contractor have the right to control the means and progress of the work except as to final results?
  3. Is the contractor engaged in an independently established trade, occupation, profession or business?
  4. Does the contractor have the opportunity for profit and loss as a result of the services being performed for your company?
  5. Does the contractor hire and pay his or her assistants (if any) and to the extent that these assistants are employees, supervise the details of their work?
  6. Does the contractor make services available to other customers even if its right to do so is voluntarily not exercised or is temporarily restricted?
  7. Do any 3 of the following elements apply?
    1. The individual has a substantive investment in the facilities, tools, instruments, materials, and knowledge used by the individual to complete the work.
    2. The individual is not required to work exclusively for your company.
    3. The individual is responsible for satisfactory completion of the work and may be held contractually responsible for failure to complete the work.
    4. You have a contract that defines the relationship and gives contractual rights in the event the contract is terminated by the you prior to completion of the work.
    5. Payment to the individual is based on factors directly related to the work performed and not solely on the amount of time expended by the individual.
    6. Such work is outside the usual course of the business for which the services is performed.
    7. The individual has an independent contractor status.

    If the answer to all or most of the 7 questions above is yes, the individual or entity you are dealing with is likely an independent contractor, not an employee. And this fact can play an important role in limiting your company's liability for injuries to an independent contractor's employees.

    Minimize Risks When Hiring Independent Contractors

    The implementation of the Act and emerging economic sectors may lead businesses to make greater use of independent contractors and blur traditional definition of "employment." The Department of Labor and many states are responding with legislation to crack down on business and impose a greater share of the liability for the acts or omissions of their independent contractors.
    With more organizations hiring independent contractors to deal with economic, staffing, and business challenges—with typical duties including janitorial duties, building construction and renovation, different production activities, security, and maintenance—it's important to understand the risk of liability your organization could face if those workers aren't properly trained on safety protocols.
    Sure, in theory independent contractors are responsible for their activities, including safety, and their liability is not transferred to the company that has hired them. However, in the real world it's not always so black and white. In fact, there are many situations where your organization could be liable.
Important Points:-
  • Conditions that could result in safety-related liability when you hire an independent contractor to perform services for your organization
  • Circumstances that could lead to claims of contributory negligence, negligent en-trustment, and more against your organization
  • Examples of "non-delegable duties" and "inherently dangerous activities"
  • How to determine if someone is an independent contractor or an employee, and strategies to make sure the relationship is clear
  • What OSHA requires when you hire independent contractors
  • Tips on how to select safe and dependable independent contractors
  • What types of safety expectations to include in your independent contractor agreements
  • Factors to consider when your independent contractor hires sub-contractors
  • How can you limit the "mixing" of your employees and independent contractor staff on the job site to avoid potential risks
  • The three types of documentation you should require before you let an independent contractor perform their services for your organization
  • Why it's important to assure that the independent contractor has a process in place for providing first aid and medical care to its workers

     

ELEMENTS OF A SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

 

ELEMENTS OF A SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

The elements of a safety management system are as follows:

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  • A safety policy which states the commitment of the proprietor or contractor to safety and health at work
  • A structure to assure implementation of the commitment to safety and health at work
  • Training to equip personnel with knowledge to work safely and without risk to health
  • In-house safety rules to provide instruction for achieving safety management objectives
  • A programme of inspection to identify hazardous conditions and for the rectification of any such conditions at regular intervals or as appropriate
  • A programme to identify hazardous exposure or the risk of such exposure to the workers and to provide suitable personal protective equipment as a last resort where engineering control methods are not feasible
  • Investigation of accidents or incidents to find out the cause of any accident or incident and to develop prompt arrangements to prevent recurrence
  • Emergency preparedness to develop, communicate and execute plans prescribing the effective management of emergency situations
  • Evaluation, selection and control of sub-contractors to ensure that sub-contractors are fully aware of their safety obligations and are in fact meeting them
  • Safety committees
  • Evaluation of job related hazards or potential hazards and development of safety procedures
  • Promotion, development and maintenance of safety and health awareness in a workplace
  • A programme for accident control and elimination of hazards before exposing workers to any adverse work environment
  • A programme to protect workers from occupational health hazards

 


Make the Most of Safety Committees

Topic: Safety Management

Safety Committees

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A safety committee is an organizational group within a workplace with members from management, the workforce as well as from all departments and staffs.The safety committee will share with management the responsibility for implementing the company safety program.
 
If you have a safety committee or are thinking of starting one, you should watch out for some missteps that can derail your committee's effectiveness. Here's how to avoid a few of them.
 
Don't turn it into the safety police: 
 
While you may have a few employees who enjoy "bossing" people around when it comes to safety, most do not. Your safety committee generally will not have the authority to enforce safety policy, so essentially you're asking them to find safety violations and rat out their fellow employees to supervisors who can actually enforce policy. If you use your safety committee to police the safety activities of other employees, you'll find that your pool of volunteers will shrink quickly.
 
Don't let it wander aimlessly: 
 
Your committee needs to know what its purpose is and what tools and resources it has at its disposal to get anything done. You can accomplish this by either working collaboratively with the committee or handing it a per-written set of guidelines.
 
Don't forget to ask why they're there: 
 
Your safety committee members joined the committee for a reason (assuming they weren't simply assigned to it). To get the most from your committee, you should ask all the members why they are there and what they'd like to accomplish during their tenure.
 
Don't forget to recognize them: 
 
Your safety committee members are putting time and effort into the safety program-—usually above and beyond their fellow employees. Don't let them sit in the shadows going unrecognized. Recognition can include refreshments at their meetings, a special lunch out, or a shout-out at an employee meeting. A note here: If you choose to recognize the committee in some public way, be sure you recognize each member and not simply "the safety committee." Let the other employees know who the individuals on the safety committee are.
 
Don't sell them short: 
 
Often employers don't take full advantage of the skills employees have that aren't directly related to their jobs. Find out which skills and passions your safety committee members have and tap them to accomplish things in your safety program (for example, developing training sessions or creating organized systems). You will likely be amazed at the resources you have sitting around the table.

Get the Most from Your Committee.

A well-run safety committee can give you a peer-driven review of safe work habits, as well as additional insight into illness and accident investigations. And when you enhance your employees' safety IQ, they become fully invested in minimizing the risk of citations, fines, and workers' comp awards.
Safety committees:
  1. Should consist of both management and hourly employees.
  2. Can help review and update safety programs and safe work practices.
  3. Should review accident investigations to look for other potential causal factors (i.e., workplace hazards) and to recommend corrective actions.
  4. Could be involved with reviewing safety suggestions and recommending corrective action.
  5. Could also be used as a pipeline for employees to report unsafe working conditions or unsafe work practices. Safety committee members can then bring these concerns to the committee and then to management.
Safety committees, when designed and implemented the right way, are incredibly effective at helping companies reduce accidents, injuries, and fines. OSHA places a high value on safety committees but doesn't make them mandatory--however, several states do.
 

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