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Showing posts with label Safety Tips. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Safety Tips. Show all posts

SAFETY TIPS: MANUAL MATERIAL HANDLING SAFETY

SAFETY TIPS - MANUAL MATERIAL HANDLING 


Work may cause a back injury or it may aggravate a per-existing back problem. In either case, the resultant low back pain can be extremely disabling.

Listed are some good principles on manual material handling.

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Some of the important principles are:

Activate your core muscles.

  • To protect your spine, tighten your abdominal muscles. This will generally activate the rest of your core muscles.
Maintain the natural inward curve of your low back.

  • This curve has a tendency to flatten when you bend or sit, increasing the strain on the low back.
  • Looking forward (not down) during a lift helps to maintain this curve.
Keep objects that you are lifting or carrying close to your body.
  • The farther the object is from your body, the greater the strain will be.
  • Slide objects close to you before lifting them.
  • When squatting to lift, do not let your knees get between yourself and the load? If the load is not too wide, spread your knees apart so you can bring the load close to your belly.
Work with your upper body as close to upright as possible.


Leaning forwards or sideways puts extra strain on your back. Wherever possible:
  • Position items that you handle so that your hands are in the safe lifting zone (between mid-thigh and shoulder height).
  • Keep loads that you must handle manually off of the floor (unless their handles are in the safe lifting zone).
  • For low-level work, bend your knees, squat or kneel. Consider a longer handled tool.
If you can't work upright, resting a hand or elbow on your knee or another object will take some of the load off of your back. Other objects that you could lean on:
  • A nearby table or chair.
  • The top of a deep container into which you must reach.
  • Any surface within a comfortable reach.
Minimize twisting of your spine.
  • Move your feet or swivel your chair instead of twisting at the waist or neck, so that your hips and shoulders are facing in the same direction.
Push, don't pull, whenever possible.
  • Pulling an object you are facing puts more strain on back muscles than pushing it. Exceptions:
  • Some objects don’t move as easily when pushed, especially when terrain is bumpy or rough.
  • Pushing may not be safe if the object you are pushing obstructs your vision and you can’t see where you are going.
  • If you must pull something, try to use 2 hands to avoid twisting.
Use sudden quick movements with care. 
  • If not performed carefully, sudden quick movements will put more strain on your back than moving more slowly (e.g., avoid jumping from loading docks or high vehicles).
  • Unexpected movements are more likely to cause injuries than deliberate movements.
  • Wear shoes with good traction and support and keep-walking surfaces clear to avoid slips, trips or falls.
  • Make sure objects you are moving do not shift during transport.
  • Proper storage will minimize injuries related to sudden movements to catch falling objects. 
Use a footrest for prolonged standing.
  • A footrest can be used to help avoid static postures.
  • Vary standing postures by shifting body weight from both to one or the other leg.
   Visit for Safety Videos:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChREXvbLQ3fPxOLKflPRj_g
 

Safety Tips : Energy Savings.


Safety Tips :- Energy Savings.

Useful tips to save Energy.



By following these simple tips one can save energy to a large extent


Lighting:
•Turn off the lights when not in use.
•Take advantage of day light by using light colored, loose- weave curtains on your windows to allow
 daylight to penetrate the room. Also, decorate with lighter colors that reflect daylight.
•De- dust lighting fixtures to maintain illumination.
•Use task lighting: instead of brightly lighting an entire room, focus the light where you need it.
•Compact fluorescent bulbs are four times more energy efficient than incandescent bulbs and provide the
same lighting.
•Use electronic chokes in place of conventional chokes.
Fans: 
•Replace conventional regulators with electronic regulators for ceiling fans.
•Install exhaust fans at a higher elevation than ceiling fans.
Electric iron
•Select iron boxes with automatic temperature cut off.
•Use appropriate regulator position for ironing.
•Do not put more water on clothes while ironing.
•Do not iron wet clothes.

Kitchen appliances.

Mixers
•Avoid dry grinding in your food processors ( mixers and grinders) as it takes longer time than liquid
grinding.

Microwaves oven
•Consumes 50 % less energy than conventional electric / gas stoves.
•Do not bake large food items.
•Unless you are baking breads or pastries, you may not even need to preheat.
•Don’t open the oven door too often to check food condition as each opening leads to a temperature drop
of 25 degree Celsius.

Electric stove
•Turn off electric stoves several minutes before the specified cooking time.
•Use flat- bottomed pans that make full contact with the cooking coil.

Safety Tips: Do's and Don'ts Earthquake

Safety TipsDo's and Don'ts Earthquake

A. Before an earthquake:


• Follow and advocate local safe building codes for earthquake resistant construction.

• Follow and advocate upgrading poorly built structures.

• Make plan and preparation for emergency relief.

• Identify the medical centers, fire fighting stations, police posts and organize relief society of your
area.

• Know the electric and water shut off locations in your house.

• Heavy objects, glasses, cutlery should be kept in lower shelves.

• Flower pots should not be kept on the parapet.

B. During an earthquake:

• Keep calm and reassure others.

• During the event, the safest place is an open space, away from buildings.

• If you are indoors, take cover under a desk, table, bed or doorways and against inside walls and
staircase. Stay away from glass doors, glass panes, windows or outside doors. Do not rush to go out
of the building, to avoid stampede.

• If you are outside, move away from buildings and utility wires.

• Once in the open, stay there till the vibrations stops.

• If you are in a moving vehicle, stop as quickly as possible and stay in the vehicle.

• Free all pets and domestic animals so that they can run outside.

• Do not use candles, matches or other open flames. Put out all fires.

C. After an earthquake:

• Keep stock of drinking water, foodstuff and first-aid equipment in accessible place.

• Do not spread and believe rumors.

• Turn on your transistor or television to get the latest information/bulletins and aftershock warnings.

• Provide help to others and develop confidence.

• Attend the injured persons and give them aid, whatever is possible and also inform hospital.

• Be prepared for aftershocks as these may strike.

• Close the valve of kitchen gas stove, if it is on. If it is closed, do not open. Do not use open flames.

• Do not operate electric switches or appliances, if gas leaks are suspected.

• Check water pipes, electric lines and fittings. If damaged, shut off the main valves. Do not touch live wires of electricity.

• If needed, open doors and cup boards carefully as objects may fall.

 


Safety Tips: Car and Two Wheeler Safety

Car and Two Wheeler Safety


1.   Always wear your safety belt and make sure all your passengers are buckled properly.


2.   Always wear a helmet, it is the stepping stone of motor cycle safety.


3.   Do not drink and drive. About half of fatal accidents involved alcohol. So when you're drinking let someone drive


4.   Always look for pedestrain especially when turning.


5.   Avoid over speeding in residential and school areas.


6.   Avoid cell phone while driving.


Safety Tips: Do’s and Don’ts - Forklift


FORK LIFT - DO'S & DON'TS



Always
  • ALWAYS KEEP THE LICENSE DURING DRIVING.
  • ALWAYS WEAR SEAT BELT DURING DRIVING.
  • SOUND HORN AT INTERSECTIONS.
  • FOLLOW 2 FEET RULE.
  • FOLLOW THE SPEED LIMIT PERMITTED.
  • INFORM TO THE SUPERVISOR ABOUT THE UNSAFE CONDITIONS PREVAILING IN THE WORK AREA.



Image result for Do’s and Don’ts - Forklift



Never


  • DON’T ALLOW ANY ONE TO TRAVEL IN THE FORK LIFT
  • DON’T PARK THE VEHICLE AT THE ENTRANCE, EXIT, MEDICAL CENTRE AND OTHER EMERGENCY EXIT.
  • DON’T STAND ABOVE AND UNDER ELEVATED FORKS
  • DON’T TRAVEL TOO FAST ESPECIALLY WHEN CARRYING LOADS.

Image result for Do’s and Don’ts - Forklift

Image result for Do’s and Don’ts - Forklift

Daily checks of fork lifts.
  • CHECK TYRE CONDITION & PRESSURE
  • WORKING OF PARKING BRAKE & SERVICE BRAKE
  • HYDRAULIC OIL LEVEL & PIPELINES FOR LEAKS
  • FORWARD & REVERSE TRAVEL
  • HAND & FOOT BRAKE
  • INSTRUMENTS
  • EXHAUST FOR NOISE & LEAKS
  • HOIST UP DOWN ,TILT & SIDE SHIFT OPERATIONS
  • RADIATOR FLUID LEVEL
  • STEERING OPERATIONS
  • ENGINE & TRANSMISSION OIL LEVEL
  • CLEANING OF TRUCK
  • BATTERY CHARGE & ELECTROLYTE LEVEL
  • WORKING OF LIGHTS,HORN,INDICATORS & MIRRORS


    Image result for Daily checks of forklifts

SAFETY TIPS: EMERGENCY EYE WASH & DELUGE SHOWERS

SAFETY TIPS: EMERGENCY EYE WASH & DELUGE SHOWERS





Let's hope you never need one, but if you do let's hope it's clean and accessible. If you get foreign particles in your eyes or a chemical spill on your body, an emergency eyewash station or deluge shower is the most important initial step in first-aid treatment. Chemical burns to the eye are among the most urgent of emergencies.



An eyewash/shower is required if:
  • The Material Safety Data Sheet indicates a chemical in use is caustic, toxic, or corrosive.
  • The MSDS informs that serious eye damage may result.
  • Warnings such as "causes chemical burns" or "causes permanent eye damage" are posted on container labels.
Eyewash/showers in addition must have the following:
  • Pure clean water
  • Hands free operation
  • Constant water flow rate for a full 15 minutes
  • Highly visible markings and signs
  • Unobstructed access
Accessibility: The single most important treatment for chemically-burned eyes is copious irrigation within seconds of injury. This means that victims should not have to climb over or around obstacles to find the eyewash station. Make sure there are no barriers to the unit.

Clean, Functional Equipment: Deluge showers should be inspected often to insure they function properly with adequate water flow, and are clean and sanitary. Portable eyewash units are an option in areas where plumbed in water is not accessible or of high enough quality. Portable units also need an anti-bacterial additive to ensure proper water sanitation. Flushing with any water is better than none, but purified water reduces potential for secondary eye infections.
Training in Proper Use: Employees who are exposed to possible chemical splashes must know in advance how to use an eyewash/deluge station properly:
  • Immediately after the accident, flood the eye with water or eyewash solution, using fingers to keep the eye open as wide as possible. Water may be colder than body temperature, which can be uncomfortable, but it is imperative to irrigate for the recommended period of time.
  • Roll the eyeball as much as possible, to remove any loose particles retained under the eyelids.
  • The eyes should be irrigated for at least 15 minutes, and the victim transported to a medical facility immediately. Continue irrigation of eyes during transport. The best way to accomplish this may be to have a portable eye-wash system ready, that can be carried along.
  • It's easy to forget about eye-wash stations or showers until they are needed in an emergency.

    Don't let yours become buried or covered with dust. It could save your sight!Do not put anything except water into the eyes to remove particles.

Safety Tips: Tips on Rescuing Trapped Passengers in Elevator / Lift

Tips on Rescuing Trapped Passengers in Elevator / Lift

Safety Tips:
  1. Trapped passenger inside the elevator car presses the emergency alarm button.

  2. On hearing the alarm, the rescue person or the people waiting to get in the lift will inform the rescue person.

  3. The rescue person alerts the trapped passengers that the rescue operation is ON and ask them to remain calm as they are safe.

  4. The rescue person then proceeds to the machine room., where he SWITCHES OFF THE MAIN FIRST.

  5. He then releases the brake to start manual hand winding operations.

  6. The hand-wheel is rotated to drive the elevator car manually ( The rescue person checks which direction is easier to hand-wind the lift. If the car is heavier , an assistant can help him).

  7. Releasing of brake is stopped once the rescue person finds the floor marking ( paint marking on the hoist ropes) matches with the bed plate level.

  8. Rescue person then climbs down to the floor at which the elevator has stopped in for hand-winding operation, opens the door with the door key and asks the passengers to come out of the elevator.

  9. Then he closes the lift door, SWITCHES ON THE MAINS SWITCH and wait for the power supply, so that the lift will be back in normal operation.


Safety Tips: Do's and Don'ts in a Confined Space Emergency

Safety Tips: Do's and Don'ts in a Confined Space Emergency


Do in a Confined Space Emergency

  • In a confined space emergency, the first thing you should do is report the situation immediately to the entry supervisor, who will notify the emergency rescue team.
  • If the entrants can perform a self-rescue safely, keep in contact with them throughout the entire procedure, and assist them in any way possible without actually entering the space.
  • If a non entry rescue is required and you are trained, equipped, and authorized to perform a no entry rescue, proceed with this procedure, keeping in constant contact with entrants.
  • If the space must be entered to rescue entrants, keep in contact with entrants, if possible, let them know that help is on the way, and wait for the rescue team to arrive.
Don'ts in a Confined Space Emergency
  • Do not leave your post at the entry point to the confined space until the rescue team arrives.
  • Do not allow anyone except the designated rescue team to enter a confined space in an emergency.

Why It Matters
  • Every year, confined space emergencies lead to many injuries and numerous fatalities.
  • Accidents and deaths may be caused by atmospheres in the confined space that are flammable, toxic, or corrosive.

Safety Tips : TEN COMMON DRIVER MISTAKE

Safety Tips

TEN COMMON DRIVER MISTAKE


1) Failing to pay attention-Zone out
Stay relaxed but totally focused.
Concentrate on the journey not your pending issues.


2) Driving while drowsy
Take breaks frequently or as required.
Make sure to get adequate rest before long trips.


3) Becoming distracted inside the car (cell phone, radio, passengers)
Avoid using cell phone while 
driving
Plan the trip and study your trip prior to commencing.

4) Failing to adjust to adverse weather conditions
Slow down in rain.
Allow longer stopping distances.
Adjust for poor visibility.


5) Driving aggressively (tail gating, running red lights and stop signs)
Allow yourself ample time to make the trip.
Remain calm and drive with a
 safety cushion.

6) Making assumptions about other drivers intentions
Drive defensively.
Allow cushion for the unexpected.
Make your intensions clear. Use turn signals etc.

7) Speeding
Obey the traffic signals.
Remember the speed limit is the legal limit in ideal conditions.


8) Changing lanes without checking blinds
Signal, check mirrors then use quick glance.
Make lane changes gradually.


9) Driving while upset
Avoid this.


10) Ignoring essential auto maintenance (brake lights, bald tires etc.)
Do weekly maintenance checks.
Replace brake pads if required. Replace tires when worn out.

Safety Tips: Be a Safe Pedestrian

Be a Safe Pedestrian


1.     Walk on the sidewalks or paths.


2.     If there are no sidewalks, walk on the right side of the road facing traffic.


3.     Cross road safely using traffic signals and crosswalks.


4.     Try to make eye contact with driver before crossing in front of them.


5.     Cross at zebra crossing.


6.     Look left, right and left again when crossing and keep looking as you cross.


7.     Wear well fittings sturdy footwear to prevent trips and falls.


SAFETY TIPS: FIRST AID FOR BURNS

SAFETY TIPS: FIRST AID FOR BURNS

Sometimes, inspite of taking precautions, fires do occur and people get burnt. Here’s what you should do in an emergency to minimize the effect of burn:
1. In the event of a burn injury, the affected portion of the body should be placed under cool,
slowly running water, or be immersed in cool water for about 10 minutes or till pain
subsides.

2. Remove jewellery before the burnt area begins to swell and do not break blisters.

3. Cover burnt area with a clean, sterile dressing.

4. Remove clothing from affected area if burn is superficial. (Superficial burns involve only
outer layers of skin).

5. Do not remove clothing if it is a deep tissue burn. (Deep tissue burns involve the entire
thickness of the skin).

6. Lay the victim down.

7. Badly burnt limb should be immobilized (hold in such a way that it cannot be moved).

8. Give small amounts of cool water If victim is conscious. (If unconscious, DO NOT give
any liquid).

9. Reassure the victim and keep him calm.

10. Immediately take the victim to the hospital, which has a burn-ward.

11. Never apply ghee, butter, oil or any greasy substance on the burnt area.


REMEMBER TO POUR WATER OVER BURNS

Safety Tips: Flammable Liquids in Industrial Plants

Safety Tips: Flammable Liquids in Industrial Plants

Good housekeeping is an absolute requirement when there are hazardous materials in your work. Most industrial plants have some kind of flammable liquids on site. And since the primary hazards are explosion and fire, the consequences of improper storage and handling can be disastrous.
Refer 29 CFR 1910.106(a)(19)

"Flammable Liquid" means any liquid having a flashpoint at or below 199.4°F (93°C). 
Flammable liquids are divided into four categories as follows:
  • Category 1 includes liquids having flashpoints below 73.4°F (23°C) and having a boiling point at or below 95°F (35°C).
  • Category 2 includes liquids having flashpoints below 73.4°F (23°C) and having a boiling point above 95°F (35°C).
  • Category 3 includes liquids having flashpoints at or above 73.4°F (23°C) and at or below 140°F (60°C). When a Category 3 liquid with a flashpoint at or above 100°F (37.8°C) is heated for use to within 30°F (16.7°C) of its flashpoint, it must be handled in accordance with the requirements for a Category 3 liquid with a flashpoint below 100°F (37.8°C).
  • Category 4 includes liquids having flashpoints above 140°F (60°C) and at or below 199.4°F (93°C). When a Category 4 flammable liquid is heated for use to within 30°F (16.7°C) of its flashpoint, it must be handled in accordance with the requirements for a Category 3 liquid with a flashpoint at or above 100°F (37.8°C).
When liquid with a flashpoint greater than 199.4°F (93°C) is heated for use to within 30°F (16.7°C) of its flashpoint, it must be handled in accordance with the requirements for a Category 4 flammable liquid.


Flammable Liquids in Industrial Plants

Rules for flammable liquids in industrial plants are found at 29 CFR 1910.106(e). Here's a quick review.
Incidental storage or use of flammable liquids. All storage must be in tanks or closed containers. The quantity of liquids allowed in manufacturing/production areas (outside of primary storage) is limited according to the liquid category and whether a container or a tank is utilized for storage. Transfer of liquids must be separated from other operations by adequate distance or fire-resistant construction. A closed piping system, safety cans, or a gravity system may be used for transfer. Air pressure transfer is prohibited. Adequate ventilation must be maintained. Means of spill or leakage prevention, control, cleanup, and disposal must be provided. Any possible source of ignition must be eliminated when using Category 1 liquids.

Unit-physical operations. Physical operations are restricted to operations not involving chemical change. All buildings and equipment must be accessible for fire-fighting purposes. Unstable liquids and small-scale chemical processes must be isolated by a 2-hour (minimum) firewall. Emergency drainage systems must direct flammable liquids to a safe location. Appropriate ventilation must be maintained when using Category 1 liquids so as to provide adequate air exchange, discharge to a safe location, and proper ventilation of floor areas or pits. Equipment must be of appropriate design for use with Category 1 liquids so as to limit flammable vapor-air mixtures.

Tank vehicle and tank car loading and unloading. The distance of separation from aboveground tanks, warehouses, other plant buildings, or nearest adjoining property lines is based on liquid category. Fire control. Fire control equipment, water supply, and any special extinguishing equipment must be adequately maintained and periodically inspected and be appropriate in quantity and type for the potential hazards. Local fire marshals must be consulted to determine specific requirements.

Fire control. Fire control equipment, water supply, and any special extinguishing equipment must be adequately maintained and periodically inspected and be appropriate in quantity and type for the potential hazards. Local fire marshals must be consulted to determine specific requirements.

Sources of ignition. Possible sources of ignition must be carefully identified and controlled. Dispensing of Category 1 liquids must be done with proper grounding.

Electrical. Locations (including surrounding areas) where flammable vapor-air mixtures may exist under normal conditions must meet Class I, Division 1 standards. Locations (including surrounding areas) where flammable vapor-air mixtures may exist under abnormal conditions must meet Division 2 standards. If only Category 3 and 4 liquids are used, ordinary electrical equipment is permitted.

Maintenance and repair. Maintenance and repair, including hot work, are permitted only under the supervision of a responsible individual in charge. This individual must make an inspection of the area before and after work. 

Housekeeping. Housekeeping must be adequate to control leaks and prevent spills. Aisle space must be adequate for fire response access. Combustible wastes and residues must be minimized, stored properly, and disposed of daily. Ground area around buildings and unit operating areas must be kept free of weeds, trash, or other unnecessary combustible materials.






Good - Chemical Housekeeping


Good housekeeping is an absolute requirement when there are hazardous materials in your workplace. 

Just as a quarterback has to keep his eyes open for changes in the defense or certain other telltale moves of opposing players, we need to keep a lookout for danger signals on the job in order to keep your "team" safe and successful.

The importance of good housekeeping is no a joke to anyone who wants to avoid the hazards presented by sloppy habits—especially when it comes to chemicals that can catch fire or explode. 
Following are some goals of good chemical housekeeping. As you read through them, be thinking about your facility's housekeeping practices and how effective they are at maintaining safe conditions.
  • You can open any storage cabinet and tell at a glance which products are there and whether any containers have leaked or spilled.
  • There is a list nearby to check off chemicals that need reordering.
  • Chemical containers are situated safely—that is, away from the edges of shelves, away from high traffic areas, and out of the way of swinging doors.
  • Empty containers are marked as such and properly disposed of right away or at least staged at a labeled bin or shelf so they don’t get confused with products still in use. You cannot find a container without a label anywhere in your business.
  • At the end of a shift, your employees tightly close chemical containers they are using and return them to their designated storage space.
  • You have supplies and personal protective equipment (e.g., safety goggles and protective gloves) for safely cleaning up small spills in each work space in a location that is easy to get to and well marked, and employees are trained about when and how to use them.

How would you rate your facility's performance on these key chemical housekeeping issues? 

If you can't say that you are 100 percent sure that your entire facility is 100 percent in compliance with housekeeping rules and that chemical storage and handling is 100 percent safe, then it's time to make some changes. Don't wait for the fire, explosion, and injuries or fatalities

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