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Showing posts with label Workplace Safety. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Workplace Safety. Show all posts

SAFETY SERIES – 17 | SAFE ACCESS TO WORKPLACE (Elevator Car top and Pit)

SAFETY SERIES :- 17
 
SAFE ACCESS TO WORKPLACE (Elevator Car top and Pit)
 

Safety Videos


A. General Instructions: For all maintenance modules:


  1. All visits should start and end with a talk to the customer if possible.
  2. The responsibility of the maintenance technician/engineer during the maintenance visit is to ensure that the equipment fulfils requirements of maintenance and quality standards.
  3. Relative to the preventive maintenance work, the need for any corrective actions should be estimated.
  4. After the visit, the reporting should be completed.

B. Working on site and performing maintenance modules

  1. Place the maintenance signs at important floors while going upwards and performing basic module or other extended module.
  2. After performing the maintenance modules remove the maintenance signs from the floors.
  3. If ladder is needed to enter the pit or machine room, portable ladders must be prevented from slipping.

C. Safety Checks before entering car top

  • NOTE! Switch ON the shaft lights from the control panel and/or from the car top before entering the car top.
  1. Call the elevator to the topmost landing by pressing the landing button. Allow the doors to
    open and ensure that there is no passenger in the elevator car.
  2. Send the elevator to a floor below by pressing two lower floor car push buttons. At a suitable
    point (approx. 1-2 seconds after starting), use the emergency release key to open the landing
    door and stop the car top level with landing floor. Block the landing door mechanically and
    wait for 10 seconds to verify that the car does not move.
  3. Operate the stop switch on the inspection drive unit. Close the landing doors. Ensure they are
    mechanically locked. Press the landing button. Wait for 10 seconds, reopen the landing door
    and check whether the car has not moved. If the elevator moves, do not get on the car top.
    Keep the elevator under shutdown and inform your superior.
  4. Place the inspection/normal switch to the inspection position from the landing. Release the
    stop switch. Close the landing doors. Ensure they are mechanically locked. Press the landing
    button. Wait for 10 seconds, reopen the landing door and check whether the car has not
    moved. If the elevator moves, do not get on the car top. Keep the elevator under shutdown
    and inform your superior.
  5. Operate the stop switch and enter now safely on the car top.

D. Safety Checks when exiting car top


  1. Stop the car top level with the landing floor (on inspection mode) and operate the stop switch.
  2. Open the landing door and block it mechanically. Ensure that there is no possibility for the building users to enter the shaft from the landing. Release the stop switch.
  3. Test and verify the landing door contact by operating the UP and DOWN push buttons. If the car moves, keep the elevator under shutdown and inform your superior.
  4. Operate the stop switch and exit the car top.
  5. Place the inspection/normal switch to normal position from the landing. Release the stop switch and close the landing door. Verify that the car is operating properly before leaving the building.

E. Safety Instructions when working on Car Top

  1. Follow the safety instructions given in “Safety During Service of Elevators”.
  2. Ensure the car top is clear of oil, grease, trash or other objects before working on it.
  3. Be aware of counterweight, other fixed and moving objects in the shaft while driving on inspection.
  4. Be aware of possible rollback when the elevator starts to move.
  5. Whenever possible perform maintenance actions only when going downwards the shaft.
  6. Do not take your body parts outside car area.
  7. Do not hold moving or rotating parts for support while moving the car on inspection.
  8. Do not move in car top while driving the car UP and DOWN on inspection.
  9. Operate the stop switch when the car is kept stationary.

F. Safety Checks before entering the pit

  1. Call the elevator to the lowest floor by pressing the landing button. Allow the doors to open and ensure that there are no passengers in the car.
  2. Send the elevator to a floor above by pressing the next two higher floor car push buttons. At a suitable point (approx. 1 or 2 seconds after starting) use the emergency release key to open the landing door and observe that this action has stopped the car. Ensure that there is sufficient clearance between the pit floor and car. Mechanically block the landing door. Remain on the landing. Switch ON the pit light.
  3. Operate the stop switch on the pit by maintaining a safe position. Close the landing doors. Ensure they are mechanically locked. Press the landing button. Reopen the landing door and confirm that the car has not moved. If the elevator moves do not get in the pit. Keep the elevator under shutdown and inform your superior.
  4. Block the landing door mechanically and enter the pit using ladders if applicable. Do not step on buffer springs. Switch ON the pit light if switch is located in the pit.
  5. Close the landing door and lock the landing door from the pit in slightly open position using the door locking tool.
  • Note! When working in the pit either secure the door in semi closed position using the door locking tool or place a barrier around the entrance or have adequate supervision to prevent unauthorized access to the exposed equipment.

G. Safety Checks when exiting the pit


  1. Open the landing door and mechanically block it in the fully open position. Switch OFF pit light if switch is located in the pit.
  2. Exit the pit carefully. Do not use buffer springs. Use ladder if possible.
  3. Release the stop switch on the pit by maintaining a safe position.
  4. Remove the mechanical block (door locking tool) and close the landing door.
  5. Verify that the elevator operates properly before leaving the building.

H. General Instructions for maintenance work in the Machine Room or with Control Panel

  1. Machine room doors and control panel cover must be kept securely locked whenever an authorized person is not in attendance.
  2. Machine rooms and control panels should have suitable warning signs and safe means of access.
  3. When working in the machine room or at the control panel ensure that unauthorized persons cannot come into contact with exposed equipment. Use barriers to segregate the work area as necessary. However, never lock yourself in a room if you are working alone.
  4. When performing maintenance work in the machine room or at control panel ensure that no one car enter the car. Follow Take 5 procedure wherever applicable.
  5. While maintaining the machine or the pulleys be aware of the risks from unexpected movement of the machine. If working in the proximity of ropes and pulleys always push the stop button if applicable. In case of control panel be aware of high voltages. Whenever possible switch the main power OFF. Wait for residual stored energy to discharge.
I. Multiple cars in the same shaft
  1. Be aware of moving and fixed objects in the shaft while driving on inspection.
  2. Where there is no partitioning screen do not walk between pits unless all elevators have been isolated.

 Visit for Safety Videos:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChREXvbLQ3fPxOLKflPRj_g


Workplace safety tips

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Workplace Safety Tips

The below listed essentials safety tips will help make your organization a safer place to work.


1. Know the hazards.

To reduce your risk of work-related injury or illness, you must first know the particular hazards of your job or workplace.

Help identify hazards by downloading this free workplace safety analysis checklist . You can also learn about risks by analyzing all workplace injuries  to find the root causes and asking your staff for input.

2. Reduce workplace stress.

Job stress has been linked to health problems, higher healthcare costs, increased risk of workplace accidents and more. Take steps to prevent stress from interfering with employees’ productivity, health and well-being with these strategies to reduce stress in the workplace.

3. Get up and move.

Encourage employees to take breaks and move around regularly throughout the day. Simply working in small breaks for movement can make a big difference in combating the dangers of staying in a static position all day long.

4. Pay attention to ergonomics.

Use ergonomically designed furniture and equipment , and rearrange work areas to maintain a neutral posture and keep everything within easy reach.

5. Use safe lifting techniques.

Use four safe moves when picking up and carrying heavy loads: Lift from a position of power, keep the load close to your body, use a staggered stance and don’t twist.
And watch the weight — the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommends limiting manual lifting to a maximum of 35 pounds for the average person. Check out more safe lifting techniques or our lifting safety video  to see the technique in action.

6. Ensure employees wear personal protective equipment.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) can dramatically reduce risk of injury if worn correctly. Examples of PPE include gear such as earplugs, hard hats, safety goggles, gloves, full-face masks and safety shoes.

7. Encourage employees to speak up.

Ask for input from employees often, and ensure everyone feels comfortable bringing safety hazards to their supervisors’ attention.

Visit for Safety Videos:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChREXvbLQ3fPxOLKflPRj_g

SAFETY SERIES:– 12 | SAFETY DURING SERVICING OF ELEVATORS

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SAFETY SERIES :- 12

SAFETY DURING SERVICING OF ELEVATORS

Servicing on elevators should be done by authorized and trained persons only. Where more than one person is working, the responsibilities and tasks for each should be clarified by the supervisor before the work is started.
 

TOOLS

  1. Ensure availability of necessary tools and equipment to complete work tasks safely.
  2. Use only approved insulated tools, which are in a serviceable condition.
  3. Electrical test instruments must be regularly tested as per manufacturer’s instructions.
  4. Tools, equipment and devices must be used in accordance with the instructions and / or guidance provided by the manufacturer.

SAFETY EQUIPMENT

  1. Company provided safety shoes must be work while on the job.
  2. Safety Helmets must be used in lift shaft when there is a chance of material falling from height. e.g roping changing work.
  3. Full body harness must be used when there is a fall hazard of 1.8 m drop and 300 mm gap from the level of work.
  4. Gloves must be used for sharp edge hazards.
  5. Use Safety Goggles / Face shield when drilling, chipping and grinding operations need to be done.
  6. Contact your Engineer for above personal protective equipment, when needed.
  7. Look for special risks at site before start of work and take adequate risk control methods. In case of doubt, contact the Engineer / Safety Officer.

SAFETY PRECAUTIONS


Familiarize yourself with the site and the building representatives


  • Get familiar with the working practices and the safety procedures of the work site.
  • To ensure your safety, liaison with the site agent/builder/building owner or his representative is recommended especially where single man working is involved. Tell the building/site representative where you are working and when. If possible, ensure that a responsible person periodically monitors your welfare.
  • Avoid working in a building that is otherwise unoccupied.

ELEVATOR SERVICE SAFETY TIPS

  • Technicians arriving at a location to perform service or repairs should alert the owner or superintendent and place “out of service” signs on elevators and at elevator entrances before any work begins.
  • Secure the elevator from the riding public when performing any adjustment or work. Ensure no one is in the car, close the doors and prevent the doors from operating while working on the elevator.
  • Before servicing elevator equipment, “tuck” loose-fitting clothing and confine long hair. Remove all jewelry.
  • Avoid smoking and open flames in the work area.
  • When cleaning, oiling, or greasing any parts that move, the elevator should be made inoperative – Switch OFF the Mains.
  • Hold wiping cloths in your palm. Never wrap them around on your hand.
  • Wire ropes should be inspected or lubricated only after the car has stopped. Stay clear of pinch points.
  • While in the pit and car top look for any tripping hazards.
  • Before equipment is placed back in service, be sure all jumpers have been removed and account for any jumpers used. All safety circuits should be tested to ensure they are operating.
  • If guards or covers have been removed during maintenance work, replace them before leaving the work area.
  • Before leaving the building, if the car is returned to service, remove all “out of service” signs. Checkout with building management.

MACHINE ROOM

  • Entry of unauthorized person to machine room should be restricted.
  • Avoid standing or walking on trap door.
  • Use controller door key and not any other tool to open the door of controller.
  • Switch Off the mains before hand winding.
  • Make sure that all the landing doors are closed before hand winding.
  • Never run the elevator with power by bypassing any elevator safeties.
  • Be careful while switching MCBs in controller; chances are there to touch the metallic part of MCB.
  • Don’t keep your hand over main sheave or on any moving parts.
  • Ensure the controller door and M/C room doors are closed after completion of all work.
  • Exercise special care when servicing governors located in awkward or tight work area.

CAR TOP

  • To enter car top, keep the lift in topmost floor. Give car call to the bottom floor and open the landing door using emergency key when car is in level with landing.
  • Switch off the cabin fan before entering car top.
  • Use only Company provided emergency key to open the landing door; don’t use any other tools.
  • Do not enter into car top if it is above / below 1 foot from landing level. Before entering car top ensure that the lift car top is at the same level.
  • Before stepping on to the car top, check for availability of adequate shaft lighting and note the location of any equipment that will move with the operation of car. Also note the location of safety switches when operated will stop the car.
  • Do not light matches or open flames for light in hoist.
  • For lighting, use only safety hand lamp. I.e hand lamp with bulb guard and approved electrical cords.
  • Do not wear loose clothing. The shirt must be tucked in.
  • Don’t smoke inside shaft.
  • Never leave the landing doors open and unattended if the car is not at the floor level.
  • Ensure that the CAR TOP STOP & INSPECTION SWITCHES are made “ON” from landing before entering on car top.
  • Ensure sufficient lighting before start of work inside shaft.
  • Stand erect and feel comfortable. Grip firmly on the stationary part of car structure.
  • Do not hold or lean for your balance on any of the parts listed below. Guides, Brackets, Wall, Counterweight, Ropes and Diverter wheel in 2:1roping.
  • Run the elevator in INSPECTION DRIVE MODE ONLY during car toptravel.
  • Keep all parts of your body inside the limits of the car area when the car is moving to avoid contact with counter weight or projections which may be located in or adjacent to the hoist way of the elevator being serviced.
  • While at work, put the Car top stop switch to OFF position. (Circuit opened)
  • While operating UP/DN switch, always alert your colleague.
  • It is important to observe the overhead obstruction, if the overhead car clearance is limited.
  • Do not clean, oil or grease when the elevator is moving.
  • Always be in a position to reach the car stop safety switch at any instant.
  • Ensure the landing doors are fully obstructed to close by itself, while attending lift in landing area.
  • If are you are trapped and not in a position to release the landing door lock, stay calm on car top and call for help. NEVER CLIMB ON ELEVATOR PARTS TO REACH THE LANDING DOOR LOCK. This can lead to dangerous consequence like fatal.

LIFT PIT


  • Before entering the pit, protect yourself by opening the pit stop switch. Verify, the car will not move.
  • Never jump down into a pit. Always use the access ladder provided. Before using access ladders, be sure they are secure and free of defects. Make sure your shoes do not have oil or grease on them before climbing ladder.
  • Before start of any work, inside shaft area other than car top, switch off the mains.
  • If the pit depth is more, use ladder to get inside the lift shaft.
  • Stay clear of counterweight.
  • Stand at a place where you are free from car and counter weight.
  • Switch off the pit switch before start of work inside pit.
  • Don’t stand on buffers.
  • Do not work if there is water inside the pit.
  • Take every precaution to make sure that no part of the body projects into portion of adjoining area.
GENERAL

  • Always use proper personnel protective equipment. This includes Helmet, Gloves, safety shoes, full body harness, goggles, dust respirator etc.,
  • Always ensure that the working tools are in good condition with proper electrical insulation.
  • Always ensure that your work place i.e., control panel area, landing area, car top area are clean and tidy both during and after the work.
  • Always use ‘Out of service’ sign board on each and every landing and for every door.
  • Don’t get work from anyone else other than the lift men.
  • Wherever the work is done keep the other men informed of what you do.
  • When cleaning, greasing or oiling any parts that move, the elevator should be made inoperative.
  • Secure the elevator from the riding public when performing any adjustments or work. Ensure no one is in the car, close the doors and prevent the doors from operating while working on the elevator.
  • Before equipment is placed back in service be sure all out of service boards have been removed. All safeties should be tested to ensure they are operating.

Workplace Violence & Harassment

Workplace Violence & Harassment

Workplace Violence is the practice  of physical force by a person against a worker in a workplace that causes or could cause physical injury. It includes any attempt or threat to activity physical force. A threat can be a statement or behavior that a worker reasonably interprets as intimidating. 

Workplace Harassment is the practice of engaging in a course of abrasive comment or conduct against a worker, in a workplace, that is known or ought reasonably to be known to be unwelcome.”

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Workplace violence and harassment can be

  • Verbal
  • Physical
  • Visual (e.g., gestures) 
  • Environmental (e.g., posting derogatory or sexually oriented posters). It can include bullying and gossip as well as domestic violence that spills over into the workplace.  

Workplace violence or harassment negatively affects workers and the work environment.  

  • It can damage people’s physical and mental health. 
  • It can decrease productivity and undermine the company culture.  
  • It can hurt a business financially because of work disruptions, decreased productivity, and the costs of violence-related injuries, government fines, and potential legal action.  
  • It can negatively affect the relationship between coworkers and between workers and employers.  
  • It can ruin the company’s reputation with clients and undermine hiring efforts. 

Some Controls Measures  

Organizations have to implement a written workplace violence and harassment policy and post it in a conspicuous location at the workplace.  

Organization must also protect workers from workplace violence and harassment. This includes conducting investigations and advising workers if there is a risk of workplace violence from a person with a history of violent behavior. 

You can’t always control the behavior of others, but you can control your own behavior.  

  • Act respectfully towards others while at work and during work-related activities. 
  • Do not engage in or put up with workplace violence or harassment, intentionally or unintentionally. Remember that harassment is often about perception rather than intention. 
  • Respect the diversity of the workplace. Learn to appreciate the unique qualities and strengths of a diverse workforce. 
  • Comply with all company policies and co-operate with any efforts to investigate and resolve matters arising from a report of workplace violence and harassment. 
  • Actively participate in any workplace violence and harassment training required by the employer and by law. 
  • In the event of a workplace violence incident, take care of your own immediate physical safety first and then report the incident to  Department Manager , or to HR / Safety / Compliance department head.

Check your organization policy:- 

Review organization workplace violence and harassment policy with your management and workers association/Union. Provide necessary training be clear about who the policy applies to (subcontractors, temporary workers, etc.) and what the consequences will be if they violate it. Share document, show them document displayed the location where it’s posted

Go over the steps to report an instance of workplace violence and harassment, explain how the investigation will be handled, and point out that workers are protected from any reprisal as a result of a report made in good faith. 

 
Visit for Safety Videos:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChREXvbLQ3fPxOLKflPRj_g

 

Hand Injuries in the Workplace

Hand Injuries in the Workplace
 
Workplace Safety
All too often, hand injuries occur when employees are distracted and aren't focused on where they are or what they're doing. It's incredibly important for employers to eliminate as many distractions as possible.

The hands are among a worker's most valuable tools, used for everything from threading delicate electrical wires to cutting through a thick steel pipe. Yet, despite how often the hands are used, hand safety and injury prevention can often be overlooked by both employers and employees.

Every year many workers are sent to the emergency room each year because of serious hand injuries. From lacerations and cuts to burns and broken bones, these injuries can be costly for employers sometimes the cost of hand injuries, and the results may be surprising to some employers:
It's also important to note that these numbers don't account for the indirect costs, like time away from work and lost productivity due to long-term damage, that are associated with even minor hand injuries.

The good news is that with the right tools, resources and education, many workplace hand injuries can be prevented. In order to protect employees from injury and reduce workers' compensation costs, employers need to first understand the who, what, where, when, and why of hand injuries.

Who is At Risk for Hand Injuries?

Everyone is potentially at risk for hand injuries. Regardless of gender, age, or industry, employers should always take steps to protect employees from even minor bumps and bruises. However, there are certain groups of employees who may be at a higher risk. Less-experienced workers, for example, or those whom the Occupational Safety and Health Administration considers to be new to the workforce, may be at higher risk for injuries at work. Whether it's due to less on-the-job experience or a heightened sense of pressure to complete tasks quickly, employers should take special care especially with less-experienced workers. Make sure new hires feel comfortable speaking up about safety concerns and create a comfortable work environment where questions are both welcome and encouraged. Safety training is also an important step, especially for younger workers who are new to the industry and unfamiliar with common, and potentially hazardous, machinery and tools.


What Types of Hand Injuries Are the Most Common?

The hands are incredibly versatile, but they're also exposed to a variety of threats that can result in injuries ranging from minor cuts and bruises to serious lacerations and burns. Some of those injuries include lacerations, crushes, avulsions or detachments, punctures, and fractures.
  • Lacerations. Lacerations are deep cuts or tears in the flesh. While most lacerations are easily treated, nerve or tendon damage is possible if the cut is deep. This can result in longer recovery time and possible long-term damage.
  • Crushes. Crushes occur when a body part—in this case, the hand, wrist, or arm—is caught between heavy equipment or machinery and another hard surface, like the floor or a wall. Depending on severity, this type of injury often causes permanent damage, particularly in cases where the crush injury prevents blood supply to the muscles.
  • Avulsion fractures or detachments. Avulsion fractures are fractures that occur when a bone is moving one way and a tendon or ligament is moving or pulled in the opposite direction. A common avulsion injury occurs when a wedding ring or other piece of jewelry gets caught on machinery and pulls a small piece of bone that is attached to a tendon or ligament away from the main part of the bone. Detachments can occur the same way but are typically more serious and often involve entire fingers or hands becoming separated from the body.
  • Punctures. Punctures often involve sharp objects, such as nails, needles, knives, tacks, machinery, or other tools. Punctures occur when one of these objects penetrates the skin and causes a wound that is typically narrower and deeper than a cut or scrape.
  • Fractures. A fracture, or a break in one of the bones of the hand, is often caused by trips, falls, and crushes. Fractures occur in the bones of the wrist and typically require weeks to months of recovery time.


Where Are Hand Injuries the Most Common?

Hand injuries are not limited to just one industry. They happen every day across a wide variety of jobs, companies, and work sites. They range from carpal tunnel syndrome in an office setting to burns at a chemical plant.

However, employees who work in construction and manufacturing industries may be at greater risk for hand injuries. Construction, for example, not only involves the use of hammers, saws, and other tools, but also the regular use of large heavy machinery, including bulldozers, dump trucks, and cement mixers. These tools and machinery, when used incorrectly, pose a risk for possible hand and arm injuries through crushing, pinching, puncturing, and more. Employees in manufacturing also frequently operate large machinery, such as drill presses, lathes, and screw machines, that can pose a high risk for hand injuries.

When Are Hand Injuries Most Likely to Occur?

Hand injuries can occur anytime. However, all too often, hand injuries occur when employees are distracted and aren't focused on where they are or what they're doing. It's incredibly important for employers to eliminate as many distractions as possible, especially in work areas where there is frequent use of heavy machinery or power tools. Remind employees to stay alert and focused, and offer them the opportunity to take regular breaks to sit down, stretch, or take a walk
.
Why Are Hand Injuries So Common?

Hand injuries can often be blamed on distraction, lack of education, or disregard for safety procedures. While, yes, negligence and inattentiveness are certainly a reason for injury, there is also an opportunity to increase preventative equipment and resources. It is analysis that most of the workplace incidents ate happening due to lack of personal protective equipment or cut-resistant gloves were to blame.


How Can Employers Prevent Hand Injuries in the Workplace?

Preventing hand injuries in the workplace doesn't have to be time consuming for employers. In fact, simply establishing and enforcing a set of rules and expectations for workers alone can be beneficial. Additional steps can and should be taken to avoid costly injuries, time off work, and lack of productivity. Consider the following preventative measures:
  • Provide PPE Ensure workers are well equipped with personal protective equipment, such as gloves, that helps protect the hands from cuts, lacerations, chemical and thermal burns, electrical dangers, and more. When selecting the type of protective glove for your employees, there are several important factors to consider that may vary based on industry. Not all gloves are made equal. For example, buy gloves that are made of synthetic rubber to protect against chemical burns may not provide adequate protection against abrasions or cuts. Fabric gloves that protect against chafing may not be sufficient protection for workers who require heat protection. That's why it's important for employers to think about the types of chemicals handled, grip requirements, size and comfort, thermal protection, abrasion and resistance requirements, and duration of contact. Remember also to consider how much of the hand needs to be protected—is only the hand exposed, or does the entire forearm need protection, as well? 
  • Encourage education and set expectations : Employers should offer education about the tools and machinery used frequently at the work site. Implement a training program to help employees get to know equipment features and the location of important buttons, such as the emergency off switch. A training program also can help highlight danger zones on equipment, such as hot spots and pinch points. Employers also should hang a list of safety tips and workplace expectations in heavily trafficked areas, such as locker and break rooms. Remind employees to remove all rings, necklaces, earrings, and other jewelry before heading to the work site or onto the manufacturing floor, and to always wear gloves. Employees should always stay focused while handling heavy machinery and tools; help them do so by minimizing distractions in areas where potentially dangerous equipment is being used.
  • Have an open door policy : Employees should feel comfortable reporting safety issues they identify in the field to supervisors. Employers should often—if not always—be present and available. Remind employees that your door is always open to report possible safety issues immediately. If and when issues do arise, take it as an opportunity to schedule one-on-one time with each employee and review what happened, what could have prevented the problem, and any other safety procedures to remember. Open and honest communication between employee and supervisor is key when confronting safety issues head on, because employees are the eyes and the ears in the field.

Tools Safety : Angle Grinder Safety

Topic : Tools Safety

Angle Grinder Safety

Power Tool Safety

Angle grinders are used for metalwork and fabrication such as grinding down welds. They are commonly used in workshops, construction, service garages and auto body repair shops. Angle grinders can be dangerous due to the high rpm involved, sparks and bits of metal that fly off as they cut and the need to remove guards to make awkward grinds.

Hazards to watch for:

  1. Most angle grinder injuries are from metal particles lodging in the operator’s eye.
  2. Kickback, where the disc is thrust away from the object it is grinding, can result in severe cuts to hands, arms, head, torso and legs.
  3. Discs can shatter or explode, sending pieces flying across the work area.

Safe procedures to follow:
  • Wear wide vision goggles, or safety glasses and a face shield.
  • Always use the correct type of disc. Make sure the disc speed limit (rpm) is greater than the angle grinder operating speed.
  • Ensure the guard and handles are secure.
  • Ensure the correct flange and locking nut are used for the type of disc. Otherwise the disc can shatter at high speed.
  • Ensure the disc is not defective or damaged. 
  • Allow the grinder to “run up” to operating speed before applying it to the job.
  • Hold the grinder against the work piece with minimum pressure so the disc doesn’t “dig in” and cause it to kick back.
  • Never bump the grinder on to the work, or let the disc hit any other object while grinding.
  • Keep the grinding disc at a 15 to 30 degree angle to the work.
  • Ensure the work piece is held firmly in a bench vice when appropriate.
  • Keep the work at waist height during grinding.
  • Stop the grinder regularly to rest your hands and arms.
  • When not in use, disconnect the power and place the grinder on a bench with the disc facing upwards.
  • Never put a grinder down until the disc stops rotating.
  • Disconnect power before changing discs.
  • Never use a cut off wheel for grinding or a grinding disc for cutting.
  • Dispose of any disc that has been dropped. Cracked or weakened discs can shatter in use.
 Conclusion:

While angle grinders have several serious hazards, safe use will minimize those hazards.
Let’s review the major points that apply to our work here and my expectations.

SAFETY SEEDS : ELEVATOR - MACHINE ROOM AND CAR TOP SAFETY TIPS



TOPICS:- ELEVATOR - MACHINE ROOM AND CAR TOP SAFETY TIPS

Safety Tips for Working @ Machine Room 


  1. Don’t stand or walk on the trap door.
  2. Use controller door key and not any other tool to open the door of controller .
  3. Switch off the mains before hand winding.
  4. Ensure sufficient illumination inside the machine room. 
  5. Make sure that all the landing doors are closed before hand winding.
  6. Never run the elevator with power by bypassing any elevator safeties.
  7. Don’t keep any materials or tools near the main rope and (Over Speed Governor) OSG rope.
  8. Don’t keep your hand over main sheave or on any moving parts.
  9. Ensure the controller door and M/C room are close after completion of all work.
  10. Always ensure to keep machine room neat and clean from unnecessary materials like Used oil, cloths, debris etc.  

Safety Tips for Working @ Car Top

  1. Ensure to follow organization SOP prior to enter at car top.
  2. Don’t keep the landing doors open and unattended if the car is not at the floor level.
  3. Switch off the cabin fan before entering car top.
  4. Use emergency key to open the door: don’t use any other tools.
  5. Before entering car top ensure that the lift car top is at the same level.
  6. Ensure that the car top stop & Inspection switches are made “On” before entering or while doing any physical work in car top.
  7. Ensure sufficient lighting before start of work inside shaft.
  8. Use the elevator in service drive mode only and not in Normal mode, if you are in car top.
  9. Keep all parts of your body inside the limits of the car area when the car is moving to avoid contact with counter weight or projections which may be located in or adjacent to the hoist way of the elevator being serviced.
  10. It is important to observe the overhead obstruction, if the overhead car clearance is limited. 
  11. Ensure the landing doors are fully obstructed to close by itself, While attending lift in landing area.
  12. Do not hold or lean for your balance on any of the parts listed below:- 
    • Guide Rails, Brackets, Wall, Counter weight, Ropes, Diverter Wheel.

SAFETY SEEDS : ELEVATOR, ESCALATORS AND MOVING WALKWAYS

ELEVATOR, ESCALATORS AND MOVING WALKWAYS 



Elevator, Escalators and Moving Walkways are used in many locations across world. These however can contribute to serious injury if not maintained.



People with management or control of elevator, escalators and moving walkways have duties to ensure they operate safety and are regularly inspected and maintained.

MUST DO'S

There are specific laws about working with plant. Here we summaries those laws for people in control of elevator, escalators and moving walkways and give you some practical tips.

Manage the risks

You must manage the risks associated with elevator, escalators and moving walkways.

For lifts, the risks include:

  • Uncontrolled movement 
  • Elevator doors closing on people
  • People trying to exit a lift that has malfunctioned
  • Insufficient communication systems
  • Unsecured lift during maintenance
  • Mechanical failure
  • Damage to the lift or its function.

For escalators and moving walkways, risks include:

  • People transporting items such as trolleys and prams
  • Fall hazards upon entry and exit
  • People getting caught in moving parts
  • Mechanical failure
  • Damage to the escalator and moving walkway or its function.

Registration and records

  • Elevator, Escalators and Moving walkways must be registered. 
  • Records must be kept of all inspection and maintenance undertaken.


Elevator  emergency communication systems

  • Every elevator must have an emergency communication system to enable assistance in the event that passengers are trapped.
  • Information is available regarding the potential risks to health and safety when migrating emergency telecommunication systems to the concerned department.


Maintenance

  • If you have elevator at your workplace make sure you put barriers across the elevator opening when its being worked on, install secure platforms on which to work and ensure the worker is protected from falling objects.
  • All elevators must have a safe entry and exit at the base of the elevator-well and a sign in the elevator, to indicate its safe working load.


WHAT CAN YOU DO

Elevator

  • Conduct regular inspections
  • If a lift malfunctions, the lift service company should be called to assist anyone trapped
  • The lift must be put out of service by the service company or building management until it is repaired
  • Never exceed the lift capacity stated inside the lift.

Escalators and Moving walkways

  • Conduct regular inspections
  • If an escalator or moving walkway malfunctions, this must be put out of service and appropriately isolated by the service company or building management until it is repaired
  • Must have appropriate guarding of moving parts
  • Provide sufficient lighting on landings
  • Ensure adequate signage about correct use.

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